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And Then I Wrote a Song About It

 

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…And Then I Wrote a Song About It
March 25-April 10

Set to the rhythm of the disco era and beyond, this earnest yet uproarious musical breaks new ground with its tour-de-force cast of one. The musical follow the adventures of a perspiring actor-singer-songwriter-dancer-secretary as he searches for love and fame in the early 1980s.

Book by Eric H. Weinberger, Music by Daniel S. Acquisto, Lyrics by Sammy Buck
Featuring Nick Cearley. Directed by Igor Goldin. Choreography by Antoinette DiPietropolo (re-created by Goldin). Conducted by Thomas Hodges.

Read bios of the authors, actor and director under the Creative Team tab

Listen to some songs from the show under the Resource Links tab

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Eric H. Weinberger (Book): Eric’s one-woman play Class Mothers ’68 was produced at Luna Stage Theatre Company in 1999 and was named Best New Comedy in New Jersey by the Star-Ledger. It went on to an Off-Broadway run in 2002-2003 and garnered a Drama Desk nomination for its star, Priscilla Lopez. Eric’s play Six Hands was produced at Yale University and also at Luna Stage along with his one-act play The Nightwatchman. Three children’s plays he wrote were produced by Andy’s Summer Playhouse in N.H. His one-woman play Lady Bird, Pat and Betty: Tea For Three, which he co-wrote with its star, Elaine Bromka, originated at 12 Miles West Theatre in Bloomfield, NJ in 2004 and has been touring the country since (www.teaforthree.com). Eric is the book writer of the musical Wanda’s World. He was nominated for a Drama Desk Award for his book, and the show was nominated for Best Musical by the Lucille Lortel Awards. A Broadway production is planned for fall 2011. Eric’s teen musical Brothers, Boyfriends and Other Criminals, based on the novel by April Lurie, will have its world premiere at Zach Theatre in Austin in January 2011. He is currently working on a musical entitled J & the Beanstalk, a contemporary version of the fairy tale.

Daniel S. Acquisto (Composer) penned many musicals with wordsmith Sammy Buck that have been performed across the US and abroad such as the award-winning Like You Like it, the critically acclaimed The 7-Year B*tch, The Frog & the Witch, Matthew Takes Mannahatta (book by Aurin Squire), incidental music for Barry the Hatchet, and the NYMF-commissioned dance piece Andy Warhol Was Right. They are also creating The Ugly Swan (Theatre C commission), and Speargrove Presents (contributing writers). Apart from Sammy, Daniel has written more than ten children’s musicals for The Kaufman Center, and composed music for Antigone: The Rock Musical, (Studio Arena, Buffalo), Dancing in the Dark (MusicalFare! Buffalo), Anything About School Almost (Tada!), Raw Impressions, the A-Train Plays, and Wild About Harry. Non-theatre commissions: USAF Clarinet Quartet, University of Cincinnati Men’s Chorus, the upcoming film Fade to White. Daniel is also a percussionist, orchestrator arranger, and music director.

Sammy Buck (Lyrics) With Dan Acquisto, Sammy has written book & lyrics for Like You Like It (NY IT Award, The Gallery Players); The 7-Year B*tch (Outstanding New Musical, Talkin’ Broadway Summer Festival Citations, NYMF, York); Vital’s The Frog & The Witch; book for Andy Warhol Was Right (NYMF); and lyrics for Vital’s Matthew Takes Mannahatta. The bookwriter and a contributing songwriter (with Dan) on Speargrove Presents (NY Theatre Barn), Sammy also wrote the book for NYMF’s first dance-musical, Common Grounds. Up next: The Ugly Swan (Theatre C). Catch his horror movie Red Hook (Phase 4 Films) on DVD, digital download or Showtime. A co-writer of the upcoming film Fade To White, Sammy has also blogged for tvland.com (shared technical Emmy). Heartfelt gratitude to Luna and the creative team, especially Eric, Nick, Igor and, as always, Dan. For my family in Texas and my families across the country. And the Lobster Song is for Wynn. Slugs. Member: BMI; The Dramatists Guild, Inc. www.sammybuck.com

Nick Cearley (Actor): Original cast of the First National Tour of All Shook Up (directed by Christopher Ashley).  Regional premieres: The Great American Trailer Park Musical (Cincinnati Ensemble Theatre, directed by Aubrey Berg), Pageant (Stoneham Theatre, directed by Bill Russell), Altar Boyz (American Stage, Fl.), Cupid and Psyche (29th Street Rep, NYC), Last Smoker in America (opposite Tony Award winner Alice Ripley, Rubicon Theatre, Calif.), and did a brief stint with Twyla Tharp in Bob Dylan’s The Times They Are-a-Changin’. Other regional credits include Forever Plaid (Alhambra Theatre, Fl.), Just So Stories (TheatreWorks, USA), A Little Night Music (Barnstormers, N.H.), Nunsense Amen! (Boston Center for the Arts).  Cearley has also worked with numerous writers of new musicals and has participated in demos, readings, workshops, and concerts in and around the NYC area.  As a musician, he has played numerous sold-out gigs with his band around Brooklyn and NYC. Cearley grew up in Cincinnati and graduated from The Boston Conservatory.

Igor Goldin (Director): Off-Broadway: With Glee (Prospect Theater at Theatre Row), YANK! (York Theatre – Drama Desk nomination for Outstanding Director of a Musical). Previous productions of YANK!: Diversionary Theatre, San Diego (Outstanding Achievement in Direction of a Musical, Stage Scene L.A.); The Gallery Players(2008 New York Innovative Theatre Award); New York Musical Theatre Festival(2005 Talkin’ Broadway Outstanding New Summer Musical). Other productions for NYMF: The Tenth Floor; Sing, But Don’t Tell; Liberty; Main-Travelled Roads(2008 Richard Rodgers Award staged reading); Unlock’d (2007 Best In Fest Award); Common Grounds (NYMF 2006 Award for Excellence In Direction). Other credits: Liberty (Workshop), Like You Like It, The Gallery Players (2009 New York Innovative Theatre Award). Tours: Associate Director, Seussical (Theatreworks USA). Regional: The Mystery of Irma Vep, The New Century, A Little Night Music, I Love You Because (NH Theatre Award nomination for Best Direction of a Musical), Romance Romance, The Complete History of America (abridged), Blithe Spirit, Dracula, Violet, The Spitfire Grill and The Full Monty. Igor was nominated by his peers for this years SDC Joe A. Callaway Award for Outstanding Direction. Member: Stage Directors and Choreographers Society (SDC).

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[tab title=”Promotional Photos”]Photos from the world premiere at Luna Stage.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 14, 2011

Nick Cearley reprises his original role in new musical
…And Then I Wrote a Song About It” at Diversionary
Igor Goldin returns to San Diego to direct the new musical

Nick Cearley, who originated the role of Randall, the perspiring actor-singer-songwriter-dancer-secretary in the ‘one-man musical whirwind’ …And Then I Wrote a Song About It, will reprise his role at Diversionary in the west coast premiere March 25-April 10.  Diversionary will produce the new musical as the 5th show in its 2010-2011 season.  …And Then I Wrote a Song About It had its world premiere at the acclaimed New York City area theatre Luna Stage last November, directed by Igor Goldin.  Goldin will direct the Diversionary production (he directed Yank! and The New Century for Diversionary).

Set to the rhythm of the disco era and beyond, this earnest yet uproarious musical breaks new ground with its tour-de-force cast of one. The musical follows the adventures of a perspiring actor-singer-songwriter-dancer-secretary as he searches for love and fame in the early 1980s.  With book by Eric H. Weinberger, music by Daniel S. Acquisto and lyrics by Sammy Buck, the show was hailed by The Star-Ledger as “extraordinarily smart, engaging and endearing” and by Talkin’ Broadway as a “joyful, funny, lighthearted musical.”

Some of Nick Cearley’s credits include: the Broadway and first National Tour of All Shook Up (directed by Christopher Ashley); regional premieres include The Great American Trailer Park Musical (Cincinnati Ensemble Theatre), Pageant (Stoneham Theatre), Altar Boyz (American Stage, Florida), Cupid and Psyche (29th Street Rep, NYC), Last Smoker in America (opposite Tony Award winner Alice Ripley, Rubicon Theatre, California.); and he did a brief stint with Twyla Tharp in Bob Dylan’s The Times They Are-a-Changin’.

Since his last visit to Diversionary, Goldin directed the Off-Broadway production of Yank! last spring, and directed the new musical With Glee during the summer and The Gay Bride of Frankenstein in January.  This is the first collaboration for Weinberger, Acquisto and Buck.  Choreography is by Antoinette DiPietropolo and will be re-created by Goldin.  Local musical director Thomas Hodges will conduct.  Links to some of the songs and full bios of the authors are posted on Diversionary’s website.

Diversionary Theatre was started in 1986.  The mission of the theatre is to produce plays with gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender themes that portray characters in their complexity and diversity both historically and contemporarily.  The Theatre is celebrating its 25th Anniversary during the 2010-2011 season.

…And Then I Wrote a Song About It previews Friday, March 25 at 8:00pm and Saturday, March 26 at 3:00pm, opens on Saturday, March 26 at 8:00pm and runs through Sunday, April 10.  Food for the opening night party will be provided by Soltan Banoo.  Performance times are: Thursday at 7:30pm, Friday at 8:00pm, Saturday at 3:00 and 8:00pm, Sunday at 2:00 and 7:00pm, with a pay-what-you-can performance on Monday, April 4 at 7:30pm.  Single tickets are $33-$35 with discounts available for students, seniors (60+), military and groups (10 or more).  For information, call the box office at 619.220.0097 or log on to www.diversionary.org.

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January 4, 2011

West Coast Premiere of new musical
“…And Then I Wrote a Song About It” at Diversionary in March
Igor Goldin returns to San Diego to direct the new musical

Diversionary will produce the west coast premiere of the new musical …And Then I Wrote a Song About It as the 5th show in its 2010-2011 season.  “We’ve had ‘to be announced’ in that production slot since the beginning of our season,” said Dan Kirsch.  “We’re so happy to have a great new show to share with our audience, and happy to have Igor Goldin back to direct at Diversionary.”  Goldin directed Yank! and The New Century for Diversionary.

…And Then I Wrote a Song About It had its world premiere at the acclaimed New York City area theatre Luna Stage in November.  With book by Eric H. Weinberger, music by Daniel S. Acquisto and lyrics by Sammy Buck, the show was hailed by The Star-Ledger as “extraordinarily smart, engaging and endearing” and by Talkin’ Broadway as a “joyful, funny, lighthearted musical.”  Set to the rhythm of the disco era and beyond, this earnest yet uproarious musical breaks new ground with its tour-de-force cast of one. The musical follows the adventures of a perspiring actor-singer-songwriter-dancer-secretary as he searches for love and fame in the early 1980s.

Since his last visit to Diversionary, Goldin directed the Off-Broadway production of Yank! last spring, and directed the new musical With Glee during the summer (one of the New York Times critics end-of-year top 10 list ranked his direction as ‘Best Staging of a Big Number in a Puny Space’).  This is the first collaboration for Weinberger, Acquisto and Buck.  Choreography is by Antoinette DiPietropolo and will be re-created by Goldin.  Local musical director Thomas Hodges will conduct.

…And Then I Wrote a Song About It will preview on March 25, open March 26 and run through April 10.  Links to some of the songs are posted under the ‘This n That’ tab.

Eric H. Weinberger (Book): Eric’s one-woman play Class Mothers ’68 was produced at Luna Stage Theatre Company in 1999 and was named Best New Comedy in New Jersey by the Star-Ledger. It went on to an Off-Broadway run in 2002-2003 and garnered a Drama Desk nomination for its star, Priscilla Lopez. Eric is the book writer of the musical Wanda’s World. He was nominated for a Drama Desk Award for his book, and the show was nominated for Best Musical by the Lucille Lortel Awards. A Broadway production is planned for fall 2011. Eric’s teen musical Brothers, Boyfriends and Other Criminals, based on the novel by April Lurie, will have its world premiere at Zach Theatre in Austin in January 2011.

Daniel S. Acquisto (Composer) penned many musicals with wordsmith Sammy Buck, such as the award-winning Like You Like it, the critically acclaimed The 7-Year B*tch, The Frog & the Witch, Matthew Takes Mannahatta (book by Aurin Squire), incidental music for Barry the Hatchet, and the NYMF-commissioned dance piece Andy Warhol Was Right. They are also creating The Ugly Swan (Theatre C commission), and Speargrove Presents (contributing writers). Apart from Sammy, Daniel has written more than ten children’s musicals for The Kaufman Center.  Daniel is also a percussionist, orchestrator arranger, and music director.

Sammy Buck (Lyrics): With Dan Acquisto, Sammy has written book & lyrics for Like You Like It (NY IT Award, The Gallery Players); The 7-Year B*tch (Outstanding New Musical, Talkin’ Broadway Summer Festival Citations, NYMF, York); Vital’s The Frog & The Witch; book for Andy Warhol Was Right (NYMF); and lyrics for Vital’s Matthew Takes Mannahatta.  The bookwriter and a contributing songwriter (with Dan) on Speargrove Presents (NY Theatre Barn), Sammy also wrote the book for NYMF’s first dance-musical, Common Grounds. Up next: The Ugly Swan (Theatre C). Member: BMI; The Dramatists Guild, Inc. www.sammybuck.com

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Lobby Art Exhibition by Gibran Barrack

Gibran Barrack is enthused to be sharing his first photography exhibition, “its a pride thing,” at the Diversionary Theater from March 25th through April 10th 2011. It is here that our community gathers to laugh, explore and celebrate with other like minded individuals in the company and harmony of good friends.

Born in San Diego (1965), Gibran, since childhood has always seemed completely fascinated with the visual world of aesthetics and beauty. He is a graduate of Creighton University (1986) and San Diego City College Graphic Design Program (1998). While in design school, Gibran discovered his natural passion for photography. Later he studied painting from artist and teacher Linda Bounds and then photography at Grossmont College from instructor and photographer Paul Turounet.

Now more than ever, Gibran feels motivated and inspired to share his images of connection and diversity with the world around through colorful portraits and vivid images. His vision is to improve upon human equality, build love and trust and help span a broader acceptance of his LGBTQ friends, brothers and sisters. “Its a pride thing” is a collection of photographs taken at Pride festivals in California over the last decade. Gibran is now beginning to volunteer his creative talents for a new non-profit Organization, “Love Out Loud.”

Show times:
Thursday at 7:30pm
Friday at 8:00pm
Saturday at 8:00pm
Sunday at 2:00pm

Added performances:
Monday, April 4 at 7:30pm
Sunday, April 10 at 7:00pm

Thursday, Sunday, Monday performances: $33
Friday & Saturday performances: $35
Students/Seniors 60+/Military: $4 off

Previews: Friday, March 25 at 8:00pm & Saturday, March 26 at 3pm (all tickets $20)

Opening night: Saturday, March 26, 2011 at 8pm. After party with food from Soltan Banoo.

Super Sunday subscribers: Sunday, March 27 at 2:00pm

First Nighter subscribers: March 25-April 4 (except opening night)

Student Rush: $12.00 tickets for students w/ID starting one hour before curtain.

Pay-what-you-can performance (tickets available at the door starting one hour prior to performance): Monday, April 4 at 7:30pm

Please ask for the discount at time of purchase.

Bring a Group and Save! Groups of 10+ /$4.00 off each ticket Groups of 30+/$8.00 off each ticket

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[tab title=”Video”]Here’s a link to video of one of the songs from the show that Nick sang at the D-Lounge. Out of context but you get the idea. It’s called I SING. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOkTaPsFChA

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Some songs from …And Then I Wrote a Song About It

Yourself in Me
http://www.bucquisto.com/songs/YourselfInMe%2010.12.01.mp3

Happening Happy New Year
http://bucquisto.com/songs/HappeningNewYear%2010.05.09.mp3

One Night Stand
http://bucquisto.com/songs/OneNightStands%2010.05.10.mp3

It Makes Me Sing (concert video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOkTaPsFChA

The Lobster and You
http://bucquisto.com/songs/LobsterAndYou%2010.05.08.mp3

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http://stagescenela.com/html/___and_then_i_wrote_a_song.html

StageSceneLA.com
…And Then I Wrote a Song About It
By Steven Stanley
March 26, 2011

Triple threat Nick Cearley dazzles as quadruple threat “Randall Klausner” in the thoroughly marvelous …And Then I Wrote A Song About It, directed to perfection by Igor Goldin at San Diego’s Diversionary Theatre.

Not at all your typical “one man show,” …And Then I Wrote A Song About It is in actuality a full-fledged one-act book musical that just happens to have a single performer playing not only its protagonist but assorted characters in his orbit, making for a funny, tuneful, emotion-packed, nostalgic look back at the last days of disco during the early years of the 1980s.

We first meet NBC employee Randall on New Year’s Eve 1981 as he waits in the wings to make his network TV debut on Tom Snyder’s Tomorrow Coast To Coast, an appearance made possible by a last-minute opening in the annual showcase of talent contest winners.

Soon, however, we’ve flashed back two years for some “Getting To Know You Time” with would-be singer-dancer-actor-songwriter Randall. Though about to turn 30, the pixyish “quadruple threat” still lives at home with his German-born parents, his old-school father a Holocaust survivor turned sausage import company mogul who wants nothing more (or less) from his son than for him to marry the right girl and take over the family business.

Randall, not surprisingly, has other life goals in mind: To be a Broadway star. To find a boyfriend. To earn his father’s respect.

Goal Number One he pursues by taking classes in singing, dancing and acting, and if his boy-next-door qualities make his dance efforts a bit “bland at first,” hard work is helping him get “sleazier by the minute.”

As a quadruple threat, Randall spends a good deal of his time writing songs, and though he’s already accumulated a stack of rejection letters this high, our spunky hero keeps plugging away with lyrics like “Special love. Forbidden fruit. Two people in a leisure suit,” which reflect his efforts at …

Goal Number Two. Unfortunately, Randall’s one-night stands seem never to materialize into second-night dates (or even a shared breakfast the morning after).

As for Goal Number Three, well that one may well be the toughest of all since it means not only persuading Papa to approve of his career goals but also getting him to accept that his son is a “qveer” and that the young woman “from a good meat family” his father dreams of as a daughter-in-law may turn out to be simply a young man with good meat.

Day-job-wise, things begin to look up for Randall when he’s hired to work at 30 Rockefeller Center as administrative assistant to an NBC bigwig, work which, if it doesn’t help Randall get that Broadway (or off-Broadway, or off-off-Broadway) gig, does at least put him in the running for the Tom Snyder talent search.

As we follow Randall’s dreams of stardom, we meet the folks who surround him. There’s Chemical Bank loan officer Lydia Alvarez, sufficiently impressed by Randall’s self-proclaimed advanced dance skills that she actually approves his loan, Randall having failed to specify that his actual level is “advanced beginner.” Other members of Randall’s “entourage” include his retired Marine General boss, his long-suffering therapist, and his pot-smoking best friend Barry, whose losing battle with AIDS not only reflects the grim reality of early ‘80s gay life in New York but also provides …And Then I Wrote A Song About It with some of its most poignant moments.

Presumably at least semi-autobiographical, Eric H. Weinberger’s book makes for a nostalgic look-back for boomers and an informative “history lesson” for those who came of age post-Disco and protease inhibitors. In addition to its witty quips (“This is the kind of therapist I need … one with bar recommendations”), Weinberger’s book demonstrates the writer’s understanding of just how complex the parent-child relationship can be. (After a particularly acrimonious exchange of words between tradition-bound father and out-and-proud gay son, Dad responds with a “How dare you stomp out! This is your home and you always have a place here.”)

Composer Daniel S. Aquito has written one catchy disco-era melody after another to accompany Randall’s journey. “It Makes Me Sing” is a particular winner, especially with Sammy Buck’s clever, touching lyrics attached: “If I’m happy or I’m sad, if god forbid, I trip and fall and end up in a sling. Oh, it makes me sing.” (“In a sling”?)

None of this would work half as well without Cearley’s captivating performance as Randall. Southland musical theater enthusiasts may recall the actor’s delightful turn as Dean in the First National Tour of All Shook Up (which played in both Orange County and San Diego). …And Then I Wrote A Song About It gives the young regional theater vet the kind of star-making role he richly deserves. Whether singing pitch-perfectly or shaking his groove-thing to Antoinette DiPietropolo’s snappy period moves or engaging one-on-one with his audience, Cearley is a lithe-and-lean bundle of energy and charm—whether fully clad or jockey shorts-only.

Sharing equal credit for …And Then I Wrote A Song About It’s success are the imaginative, incisive directorial contributions of Goldin, the production representing the New York-based director’s third terrific Diversionary show—following 2008’s Yank! and 2009’s The New Century. (Goldin has also recreated DiPietropolo’s choreography for this West Coast Premiere, and co-designed the show’s nifty New York-y set with Bret Young.)

Providing expert musical accompaniment on piano and keyboards is conductor Thomas Hodges, with Bradley Sattler on drums. Michelle Caron’s lighting design, Hunter Kaczorowski’s costumes, and David Medina’s properties are all topnotch. Ryan Ford is stage manager

…And Then I Wrote A Song About It, proves well worth a day-trip to San Diego. While its New York-based talent differs from Diversionary Theatre’s usual sensational local talent-pool, the creative team’s decision to West Coast Premiere their “baby” at Diversionary reflects their confidence in the country’s third oldest continuously producing LGBT theater company. Once again, a Diversionary Theatre production makes for a terrific road trip down south.

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http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2011/mar/23/theater-preview-diversionary-helps-tune-another-m/

Theater preview: Diversionary tunes a ‘Song’ for NYC
By James Hebert
Originally published March 23, 2011

A new musical, aiming for bigger things after a promising start in New York, schedules its second major production for … a 106-seat theater in faraway San Diego?

If that seems a head-scratcher of a developmental path for “And Then I Wrote a Song About It,” the one-man show opening at Diversionary Theatre this weekend, consider a bit of history:

In 2008, the musical “Yank!” — fresh off a successful first full staging in Brooklyn — journeyed to Diversionary for its West Coast debut. Then, after a strong reception at the University Heights theater, all “Yank!” did was land off-Broadway, scoop up multiple awards nominations and get picked up for a (still-planned) Broadway production.

As it happens, the director of “Yank!” was Igor Goldin, who is now directing “And Then I Wrote a Song About It.” That’s no coincidence — Goldin liked the way things went here with “Yank!” (he subsequently directed “A New Century” at Diversionary), and says the new show likewise has stirred interest from off-Broadway producers. The Diversionary staging, he adds, has benefits for both show and theater.

“They get a West Coast premiere — that gives it a little cachet, which is always nice for a theater company,” Goldin says. “And it gives us another opportunity to put it on its feet, and also to see how it resonates with a different audience that might have different sensibilities.

“What happens at Diversionary will very much influence what direction we take with future rewrites and (development).”

The new musical, which premiered at Luna Stage in West Orange, N.J., (just across the Hudson from Manhattan) last year, is loosely based on the coming-of-age of its writer, Eric H. Weinberger. Through the course of a 13-number score by composer Daniel S. Acquisto and lyricist Sammy Buck, sole character Randall (played by the Broadway-seasoned Nick Cearley) struggles to achieve his dream of making it in show biz.

“It’s about this boy’s journey, his coming out, his navigating life in New York City during the AIDS crisis, and his ultimate need to make his father (a strict German immigrant) proud,” Goldin says.

The themes fit Diversionary’s mission of staging plays that deal with gay, lesbian and bisexual issues. But the fact it’s such a compact, yet fully realized musical might make it appealing to the artistic tastes (and budgets) of plenty of other theaters, says Goldin.

“It’s really one of a kind,” he says.

And yet, given its kinship with “Yank!,” maybe destined to become part of a matched pair.

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